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BIOGRAPHY Courtesy: Youri Egorov Stichting Reprinted with permission of the Youri Egorov Foundation. Introduction The   Dutch-Russian   pianist   Youri   Egorov   made   his   mark   on   the   performance   of   classical   music   in   his   own highly   individual   way.   Opposed   to   gimmicks   and   show,   he   went   his   own   way.   A   career   scarcely   interested him. “I    am    especially    interested    in    the    structure    of    the    music,”    Youri    recounted    in    an    interview    with    Jan Brokken.   “Each   interval   has   a   different   significance,   and   that   is   what   I   want   to   bring   out.   I   favour   a   legato playing   style,   a   singing   effect.   I   play   softly,   not   in   terms   of   volume,   but   concerning   touch.   I   try   to   tense   my muscles   as   little   as   possible   because   otherwise   a   rugged   sound   will   result.”   A   reviewer   in   ‘Le   Monde’ compared Egorov’s expression and touché in the same breath with that of Dinu Lipatti. The   memorable   concert   of   27   November   1987   in   the   Concertgebouw   in   Amsterdam   was   not   Youri’s   last one.   Even   so,   he   regarded   this   concert   as   marking   his   withdrawal   from   the   podium.   With   Schubert’s ‘Moments   Musicaux’   it   seemed   as   if   he   wanted   to   make   his   musical   will   and   testament.   Using   the   player   at the   top   of   the   screen   you   can   listen   to   the   second   movement   of   this   work.   “Youri   Egorov   coerces   the   ear into a magic circle with Schubert” was the headline in the ‘Volkskrant’ the next day.  This   website   is   intended   to   keep   the   memories   of   Youri   Egorov   alive.   You   will   find   here   his   biography, discography   (you   can   listen   to   his   last   (home)   recording),   and   you   get   an   impression   of   his   concerts.   In addition   you   will   find   reviews   of   his   performances,   articles   that   were   published   about   him,   interviews (including   the   above-mentioned   interview   with   Jan   Brokken   and   verbal   (!)   interviews)   and   information about   the   documentary   that   Eline   Flipse   made   about   him.   You   get   an   idea   of   the   many   initiatives   of   the Youri   Egorov   Foundation.   Memories   are   recalled   and   you   may   become   acquainted   with   things   that   are   not directly connected with Youri’s music, but that are worthwhile despite this. I   would   like   to   extend   my   special   thanks   to   Jan   Brokken,   Stan   Van   Loon,   Marc   van   der   Meulen,   Tonny Noordman and Betty Prins. And naturally to Youri himself. Enjoy! Gerda Koppelman Biography Youri   Egorov   was   born   on   28   May   1954   in   Kazan,   USSR.   Between   the   ages   of   6   and   17   he   studied   music   at the Kazan Music School. Thereafter he studied for six years with Yakov Zak at the Moscow Conservatory. In   1974   Egorov   won   third   prize   at   the   International   Tchaikovsky   Competition   in   Moscow.   The   following year, 1975, he won third prize at the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Belgium. In 1976, just before a concert in Brescia, Italy, he applied for political asylum and went to Amsterdam. The   pianists   Sviatoslav   Richter,   Dinu   Lipatti,   Michelangeli,   Horowitz   and   Glenn   Gould   had   a   great   influence on him. He performed with the most prominent orchestras and was included in the major recital series. On   16   April   1988   he   died   at   home   from   the   consequences   of   AIDS.   Jan   Brouwer,   his   lifetime   companion, followed him on 25 August in the same year. Russia Youri   Egorov   was   born   in   1954   in   the   Russian   town   of   Kazan.   His   mother   was   a   mathematics   teacher   at   a high   school,   his   father   a   geography   teacher.   He   had   two   brothers,   Alexander   and   Vladimir.   Like   his brothers,   he   began   his   musical   education   at   the   age   of   six   at   the   Kazan   Music   School.   Here   he   received lessons from Irina Dubinina, a former pupil of the celebrated Yakov Zak. At   the   age   of   twelve   Youri   won   the   prize   for   the   best   interpretation   of   Shostakovitch’s   Second      Piano Concerto   during   a   national   competition.   On   this   occasion   he   received   an   autographed   score   from   the composer.   At   the   age   of   seventeen   he   went   to   continue   his   study   of   the   piano   for   six   years   at   the   Moscow Conservatory   under   Yakov   Zak.   Egorov   in   a   Dutch   newspaper   concerning   his   student   years:   “We   could study   mainly   the   familiar   repertoire   up   to   and   including   Prokofiev,   Shostakovitch   and   Shchedrin.   But composers such as Vinogradov and Denisov, the Soviet avant-garde, were not included.” In   1971   Youri   won   the   fourth   prize   at   the   Marguérite   Long-Jacques   Thibaud   Concours   in   Paris.   In   1974   he won   third   prize   at   the   Tchaikovsky   Competition   and   a   year   later,   1975,   the   third   prize   at   the   Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels. In    May    1976    Youri    was    sent    to    Italy    by    the    Russian    State    Impresariat,    but    managed    to    evade    his supervisors.   He   applied   for   political   asylum   in   the   Netherlands,   aged   only   just   22   years.   Youri   very   soon met   in   Amsterdam   the   architect   Jan   Brouwer,   who   would   become   his   lifetime   partner.   But   caution   was recommended. In letters to his family he referred to his friend as his girlfriend. The Netherlands In   1977   Youri   Egorov   participated   in   the   Van   Clibum   Competition   in   Texas,   where   he   was   the   audience’s favourite.   When   it   became   apparent   that   Youri   was   not   among   the   finalists,   the   disappointed   audience collected   together   a   money   prize   of   $10,000,   equivalent   to   the   first   prize.   In   addition,   he   received   an   offer from the New York impresario Maxim Gershunoff for a series of concerts, even before the finale. Youri   made   his   New   York   recital   debut   on   23   January   1978   in   the   Alice   Tully   Hall   in   the   Lincoln   Center. During   the   ensuing   months   he   performed   in   Chicago,   a   critic   praising   his   performance   as   “the   debut   of the   decade”.   In   July   1978   Musical   America   Magazine   selected   Youri   Egorov   as   ‘Musician   of   the   Month”.   He made his debut in Carnegie Hall on 16 December 1978. The concert was recorded live. In   1981   Youri   attended   the   piano   festival   La   Roque   d’Anthéron.   This   was   the   festival’s   first   year.   It   was   due partly to the discovery of such an exceptional artist as Youri Egorov that the festival was a great success. In   the   1980’s   Youri   performed   mainly   in   Europe.   He   alternated   solo   performances   with   chamber   music, with,   amongst   others,   Barbara   Hendriks   and   Emmy   Verhey.   Exclusively   for   EMI   Youri   regularly   recorded albums   with   works   by   Beethoven,   Schumann,   Mozart   and   Debussy.   His   Preludes   by   Debussy   was   given   a ten in the music magazine Luister. In 1988 Yuri died at home in Amsterdam as a consequence of AIDS. He was just 33 years old. Death Youri Egorov was born in Kazan, USSR, on 28 May 1954. On 16 April 1988 he died at home in Amsterdam as a consequence of AIDS. Due   to   the   taboo   resting   on   that   disease   at   the   time,   it   was   not   made   public   that   Youri   had   AIDS,   but   it was said that he had died of a brain haemorrhage. In the press Youri Egorov was not a person who sought publicity. “I   have   no   name,   for   I   am   not   a   prostitute,”   he   says   in   Eline   Flipse’s   documentary.   “Only   a   simple   musician. With talent.” Youri Egorov’s interviews are therefore relatively few in number. At   the   top   of   this   page   you   find   links   through   to   the   most   significant   articles,   interviews   and   reviews.   The Dutch ones have been left untranslated. You   can   further   click   through   to   a   description   of   the   documentary   made   by   Eline   Flipse:   Youri   Egorov 1954–1988. This description is given here in English. Documentary Youri   Egorov   died   on   16   April   1988.   About   a   year   later,   on   21   May   1989,   the   Dutch   broadcasting   company VPRO    broadcast    the    documentary    ‘Youri    Egorov    1954–1988’    that    Eline    Flipse    had    made    about    him together   with   Jan   Langeveld.   This   documentary   was   nominated   for   the   Prix   Italia   1990   and   received   the Special   Jury   Prize   BANFF   World   Television   Festival,   Banff,   Alberta,   Canada.   The   video   version   that   the   Youri Egorov Foundation marketed is no longer available. Youri’s   mother,   his   life   partner   Jan   Brouwer,   Svetlana   Obolensky   (a   friend)   and   colleagues   such   as   Emmy Verhey,   Gidon   Kremer   and   Maria   Joao   Pires   look   back   on   Youri’s   short   life.   Just   before   his   death,   Egorov read   some   lines   from   Anna   Achmatova:   “In   the   house   of   the   poet   in   exile,   fear   and   the   Muses   keep   the watch in turn.” That is what had typified his life: fear and the pursuit of beauty. A   week   after   Youri’s   death   his   mother   received   for   the   first   time   permission   to   come   to   the   Netherlands. His    death    was    extra    painful    for    her    because    everything    was    changing    in    Russia,    with    glasnost    and perestroika. She had spoken with Youri about possible plans for the future. Hans   Kerkhoff,   organizer   of   the   VARA   Matinee,   recounts   Youri’s   performances   during   the   Tchaikovsky Competition   in   Moscow.   Kerkhoff   gave   Youri   a   10+   for   his   interpretation   of   Liszt’s   La   Campanella,   and decided   to   invite   him   to   Amsterdam   to   play   for   the   VARA   Matinee   [concerts   on   Saturday   afternoon   in   the Concertgebouw   sponsored   and   broadcast   by   one   of   the   Dutch   broadcasting   corporations].   Youri’s   Russian friend   Svetlana   Obolensky   shows   us   letters   that   Youri   sent   her   over   the   years,   starting   from   1975.   They met   each   other   for   the   first   time   at   the   Queen   Elisabeth   Competition   in   Brussels.   Youri’s   depressive tendencies also become clear from the letter and from fragments from his diary. We   see   scenes   from   Brescia,   Italy,   where   the   refugee   camp   was   situated   where   Youri   stayed   for   a   month before   he   could   travel   to   Amsterdam.   From   the   extracts   from   his   diary   we   hear   that   he   had   there experienced   the   ultimate   in   loneliness.   Once   in   Amsterdam   he   seemed   in   the   beginning   to   be   more interested   in   enjoying   the   freedom   there,   which   could   give   rise   to   problems.   At   the   same   time   he   was sometimes   playing   crazy   programmes,   such   as   all   twenty-four   Chopin   Etudes   in   order   to   rival   his   teacher, Yakov Zak. René   Martin,   at   that   time   director   of   La   Roque   d’Antherón,   tells   about   the   discovery   of   Youri   and   his participation   in   the   first   festival.   That   Youri   had   problems   going   along   with   the   media   circus   became apparent   during   an   interview   that   was   made   with   him   during   that   festival.   Youri   turned   his   back   on   the camera   in   a   clear   display   of   displeasure.   Jan   Brouwer:   “Youri   was   more   someone   who   was   too   sensitive   to the ambiance in which he was playing.” Maria   Joao   Pires   recounts:   “In   addition   to   a   perfect   technique   he   had   a   capacity   that   you   rarely   find   in people:   communicating   with   higher   spheres.   Alongside   that   there   was   the   capacity   for   intense   suffering   in his playing.” At   the   end   of   the   documentary,   Hans   Kerkhoff   returns   briefly   to   Youri’s   last   concert   in   the   Concertgebouw in   Amsterdam   where   he   played   Schubert’s   Moments   Musicaux:   “As   musician   he   was   at   his   best   in   his   last days.   That   Schubert,   that   was   unforgettable.   In   retrospect   you   could   almost   say,   on   the   boundary   of death.” Youri Egorov Foundation (Stichting Youri Egorov) After   Youri’s   death   the   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   was   created   in   his   memory,   in   the   beginning   with   Dick Swaan as chairperson. Betty Prins filled this position later. Youri   Egorov   was   always   trying   to   encourage   the   exchange   of   musical   ideas   between   East   and   West.   With his   great   knowledge   of   the   Moscow   Conservatory   and   the   love   of   Amsterdam   that   he   soon   gained,   he   was the   ideal   person   for   such   a   dialogue.   He   gave   masterclasses   at,   among   other   places,   the   Sweelinck Conservatory   in   Amsterdam,   encouraged   young   musicians,   such   as   Andrei   Nikolsky,   from   Eastern   Block lands,   and   received   East-European   musicians   who   performed   in   the   Netherlands.   Partly   through   modesty, partly   due   to   the   political   situation,   he   said   little   about   these   contacts.   The   rapid   changes   in   Moscow   that he   was   able   to   experience   during   the   last   months   of   his   life,   he   welcomed   as   a   blessing   for   music. Continuing   along   this   way,   the   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   proposed   as   its   aims   not   only   bringing   Youri’s existing   recording   material   out   on   CD,   but   also   advancing   the   musical   education   and   development   of young   musicians   in   the   Netherlands   and   Eastern   Europe.   This   latter   has   been   attempted   by   means   of   the creation of exchange programmes between young musicians and the provision of grants. This   began   with   the   organization   of   a   benefit   concert   in   the   Concertgebouw   in   Amsterdam   on   29   May 1989,   in   which   well-known   musicians   participated.   This   was   followed   by   an   equally   successful   benefit concert in Brussels. At   the   same   time   as   the   benefit   concert,   the   foundation   produced   its   first   CD,   with   the   memorable Moments Musicaux by Schubert. During   the   foundation’s   early   years,   concerts   and   masterclasses   were   organized   in   Youri   Egorov’s   former home   on   the   Keizersgracht.   Furthermore,   young   musicians   could   lodge   and   rehearse   there.   This,   too,   had been   one   of   Youri’s   wishes.   During   his   busy   concert   career   he   had   often   experienced   relatively   poor facilities   for   soloists   and   had   seen   how   difficult   it   often   is   to   practise   with   the   necessary   concentration   in   a strange   city.   After   a   few   years   the   concerts   relocated   to   the   Amstelkerk   (also   in   Amsterdam).   Many musicians were happy to take part in these concerts. The   foundation   produced   a   further   three   CD’s   after   the   Schubert   one,   and   later   combined   all   four   into   a box with the title Youri Egorov Legacy. These   CD’s   bear   recordings   that   had   not   previously   appeared   on   CD.   On   the   CD   box   is   shown   a   silhouette of   Youri,   created   by   Elly   Stroucken-de   Jager.   This   silhouette   served   as   the   basis   for   the   foundation’s beautiful   logo.   The   lines   crossing   each   other   come   from   a   work   of   art   in   Youri’s   house,   designed   by   Aldo van den Nieuwelaar. After   17   busy   years,   the   steering   committee   of   the   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   decided   in   2005   to   wind   up the   foundation   in   the   form   it   had   taken   until   then.   At   the   same   time   it   was   decided   to   employ   the foundation’s   capital   for   a   similar   purpose   while   perpetuating   Youri   Egorov’s   name.   This   capital   was   made available   to   the   Young   Pianist   Foundation   (YPF),   which   had   been   founded   in   1999.   The   aim   of   the   YPF   is   to raise   the   standard   of   Dutch   tuition   to   an   international   level.   It   organizes   performances,   competitions   and masterclasses   and   produces   CD’s.   The   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   continues   as   a   Name   Fund   under   the   YPF, thus contributing to the realization of the YPF’s aims. Benefit concert One   of   the   foundation’s   first   public   activities   was   the   organization   of   a   benefit   concert   on   29   May   1989   in the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. Prominent   musicians   took   part   in   this,   such   as   Maria   Joao   Pires,   Mischa   Maisky,   Emmy   Verhey,   the   late pianist Andrei Nikolsky and Pavel Egorov (no relation). The   exodus   of   Russian   musicians   to   the   west   had   forced   the   Russian   authorities   to   take   due   measures. For   this   benefit   concert   Pavel   Egorov   received   permission   for   the   first   time   in   twelve   years   to   perform abroad. Equally   successful   was   the   benefit   concert   that   the   foundation   later   organized   in   the   Palace   of   Pure   Arts   in Brussels,   with   stars   such   as   Valeri   Afanassiev,   Vadim   Sacharov,   Gidon   Kremer,   Andrei   Nikolsky,   Mischa Maisky, Martha Argerich and Alexander Rabinovitch. Links Youri’s   favourite   pianists   were   Sviatoslav   Richter   and   Arturo   Benedetti   Michelangeli.   In   addition   he   had great admiration for the singers Maria Callas and Kathleen Ferrier. You will find here links to the sites about these musicians. Young Pianist Foundation [ LINK  ] Sviatoslav Richter [ LINK ] Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli [ LINK  ] Jakov Zak [ LINK  ] Maria Callas [ LINK  ] Kathleen Ferrier [ LINK  ] Colophon Editors: Gerda Koppelman, Stan Van Loon English translation (from the Dutch): Gerald Mettam

BIOGRAPHY

BIOGRAPHY Courtesy: Youri Egorov Stichting Reprinted    with    permission    of    the    Youri    Egorov Foundation. Introduction The    Dutch-Russian    pianist    Youri    Egorov    made    his mark   on   the   performance   of   classical   music   in   his own    highly    individual    way.    Opposed    to    gimmicks and   show,   he   went   his   own   way.   A   career   scarcely interested him. “I   am   especially   interested   in   the   structure   of   the music,”    Youri    recounted    in    an    interview    with    Jan Brokken.   “Each   interval   has   a   different   significance, and   that   is   what   I   want   to   bring   out.   I   favour   a   legato playing   style,   a   singing   effect.   I   play   softly,   not   in terms    of    volume,    but    concerning    touch.    I    try    to tense    my    muscles    as    little    as    possible    because otherwise   a   rugged   sound   will   result.”   A   reviewer   in ‘Le     Monde’     compared     Egorov’s     expression     and touché in the same breath with that of Dinu Lipatti. The   memorable   concert   of   27   November   1987   in   the Concertgebouw   in   Amsterdam   was   not   Youri’s   last one.   Even   so,   he   regarded   this   concert   as   marking his    withdrawal    from    the    podium.    With    Schubert’s ‘Moments   Musicaux’   it   seemed   as   if   he   wanted   to make    his    musical    will    and    testament.    Using    the player   at   the   top   of   the   screen   you   can   listen   to   the second     movement     of     this     work.     “Youri     Egorov coerces   the   ear   into   a   magic   circle   with   Schubert” was the headline in the ‘Volkskrant’ the next day.  This   website   is   intended   to   keep   the   memories   of Youri   Egorov   alive.   You   will   find   here   his   biography, discography    (you    can    listen    to    his    last    (home) recording),     and     you     get     an     impression     of     his concerts.    In    addition    you    will    find    reviews    of    his performances,    articles    that    were    published    about him,     interviews     (including     the     above-mentioned interview   with   Jan   Brokken   and   verbal   (!)   interviews) and   information   about   the   documentary   that   Eline Flipse   made   about   him.   You   get   an   idea   of   the   many initiatives   of   the   Youri   Egorov   Foundation.   Memories are   recalled   and   you   may   become   acquainted   with things   that   are   not   directly   connected   with   Youri’s music, but that are worthwhile despite this. I    would    like    to    extend    my    special    thanks    to    Jan Brokken,    Stan    Van    Loon,    Marc    van    der    Meulen, Tonny Noordman and Betty Prins. And naturally to Youri himself. Enjoy! Gerda Koppelman Biography Youri   Egorov   was   born   on   28   May   1954   in   Kazan, USSR.    Between    the    ages    of    6    and    17    he    studied music    at    the    Kazan    Music    School.    Thereafter    he studied   for   six   years   with   Yakov   Zak   at   the   Moscow Conservatory. In   1974   Egorov   won   third   prize   at   the   International Tchaikovsky   Competition   in   Moscow.   The   following year,     1975,     he     won     third     prize     at     the     Queen Elisabeth Competition in Belgium. In   1976,   just   before   a   concert   in   Brescia,   Italy,   he applied for political asylum and went to Amsterdam. The      pianists      Sviatoslav      Richter,      Dinu      Lipatti, Michelangeli,   Horowitz   and   Glenn   Gould   had   a   great influence    on    him.    He    performed    with    the    most prominent   orchestras   and   was   included   in   the   major recital series. On    16    April    1988    he    died    at    home    from    the consequences    of    AIDS.    Jan    Brouwer,    his    lifetime companion,   followed   him   on   25   August   in   the   same year. Russia Youri   Egorov   was   born   in   1954   in   the   Russian   town of   Kazan.   His   mother   was   a   mathematics   teacher   at a   high   school,   his   father   a   geography   teacher.   He had   two   brothers,   Alexander   and   Vladimir.   Like   his brothers,   he   began   his   musical   education   at   the   age of   six   at   the   Kazan   Music   School.   Here   he   received lessons   from   Irina   Dubinina,   a   former   pupil   of   the celebrated Yakov Zak. At   the   age   of   twelve   Youri   won   the   prize   for   the   best interpretation     of     Shostakovitch’s     Second          Piano Concerto    during    a    national    competition.    On    this occasion    he    received    an    autographed    score    from the   composer.   At   the   age   of   seventeen   he   went   to continue   his   study   of   the   piano   for   six   years   at   the Moscow   Conservatory   under   Yakov   Zak.   Egorov   in   a Dutch   newspaper   concerning   his   student   years:   “We could   study   mainly   the   familiar   repertoire   up   to   and including    Prokofiev,    Shostakovitch    and    Shchedrin. But   composers   such   as   Vinogradov   and   Denisov,   the Soviet avant-garde, were not included.” In   1971   Youri   won   the   fourth   prize   at   the   Marguérite Long-Jacques   Thibaud   Concours   in   Paris.   In   1974   he won   third   prize   at   the   Tchaikovsky   Competition   and a    year    later,    1975,    the    third    prize    at    the    Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels. In   May   1976   Youri   was   sent   to   Italy   by   the   Russian State     Impresariat,     but     managed     to     evade     his supervisors.   He   applied   for   political   asylum   in   the Netherlands,    aged    only    just    22    years.    Youri    very soon   met   in   Amsterdam   the   architect   Jan   Brouwer, who   would   become   his   lifetime   partner.   But   caution was    recommended.    In    letters    to    his    family    he referred to his friend as his girlfriend. The Netherlands In   1977   Youri   Egorov   participated   in   the   Van   Clibum Competition   in   Texas,   where   he   was   the   audience’s favourite.   When   it   became   apparent   that   Youri   was not   among   the   finalists,   the   disappointed   audience collected     together     a     money     prize     of     $10,000, equivalent   to   the   first   prize.   In   addition,   he   received an    offer    from    the    New    York    impresario    Maxim Gershunoff   for   a   series   of   concerts,   even   before   the finale. Youri   made   his   New   York   recital   debut   on   23   January 1978   in   the   Alice   Tully   Hall   in   the   Lincoln   Center. During     the     ensuing     months     he     performed     in Chicago,    a    critic    praising    his    performance    as    “the debut   of   the   decade”.   In   July   1978   Musical   America Magazine   selected   Youri   Egorov   as   ‘Musician   of   the Month”.   He   made   his   debut   in   Carnegie   Hall   on   16 December 1978. The concert was recorded live. In   1981   Youri   attended   the   piano   festival   La   Roque d’Anthéron.   This   was   the   festival’s   first   year.   It   was due   partly   to   the   discovery   of   such   an   exceptional artist   as   Youri   Egorov   that   the   festival   was   a   great success. In   the   1980’s   Youri   performed   mainly   in   Europe.   He alternated   solo   performances   with   chamber   music, with,   amongst   others,   Barbara   Hendriks   and   Emmy Verhey.   Exclusively   for   EMI   Youri   regularly   recorded albums     with     works     by     Beethoven,     Schumann, Mozart   and   Debussy.   His   Preludes   by   Debussy   was given a ten in the music magazine Luister. In    1988    Yuri    died    at    home    in    Amsterdam    as    a consequence of AIDS. He was just 33 years old. Death Youri   Egorov   was   born   in   Kazan,   USSR,   on   28   May 1954. On   16   April   1988   he   died   at   home   in   Amsterdam   as a consequence of AIDS. Due   to   the   taboo   resting   on   that   disease   at   the   time, it   was   not   made   public   that   Youri   had   AIDS,   but   it was said that he had died of a brain haemorrhage. In the press Youri   Egorov   was   not   a   person   who   sought   publicity. “I   have   no   name,   for   I   am   not   a   prostitute,”   he   says in     Eline     Flipse’s     documentary.     “Only     a     simple musician. With talent.” Youri   Egorov’s   interviews   are   therefore   relatively   few in number. At   the   top   of   this   page   you   find   links   through   to   the most   significant   articles,   interviews   and   reviews.   The Dutch ones have been left untranslated. You   can   further   click   through   to   a   description   of   the documentary    made    by    Eline    Flipse:    Youri    Egorov 1954–1988. This description is given here in English. Documentary Youri   Egorov   died   on   16   April   1988.   About   a   year later,    on    21    May    1989,    the    Dutch    broadcasting company   VPRO   broadcast   the   documentary   ‘Youri Egorov   1954–1988’   that   Eline   Flipse   had   made   about him   together   with   Jan   Langeveld.   This   documentary was   nominated   for   the   Prix   Italia   1990   and   received the     Special     Jury     Prize     BANFF     World     Television Festival,   Banff,   Alberta,   Canada.   The   video   version that    the    Youri    Egorov    Foundation    marketed    is    no longer available. Youri’s     mother,     his     life     partner     Jan     Brouwer, Svetlana   Obolensky   (a   friend)   and   colleagues   such as    Emmy    Verhey,    Gidon    Kremer    and    Maria    Joao Pires   look   back   on   Youri’s   short   life.   Just   before   his death,      Egorov      read      some      lines      from      Anna Achmatova:   “In   the   house   of   the   poet   in   exile,   fear and   the   Muses   keep   the   watch   in   turn.”   That   is   what had typified his life: fear and the pursuit of beauty. A   week   after   Youri’s   death   his   mother   received   for the      first      time      permission      to      come      to      the Netherlands.    His    death    was    extra    painful    for    her because    everything    was    changing    in    Russia,    with glasnost   and   perestroika.   She   had   spoken   with   Youri about possible plans for the future. Hans    Kerkhoff,    organizer    of    the    VARA    Matinee, recounts       Youri’s       performances       during       the Tchaikovsky   Competition   in   Moscow.   Kerkhoff   gave Youri    a    10+    for    his    interpretation    of    Liszt’s    La Campanella,      and      decided      to      invite      him      to Amsterdam   to   play   for   the   VARA   Matinee   [concerts on     Saturday     afternoon     in     the     Concertgebouw sponsored    and    broadcast    by    one    of    the    Dutch broadcasting    corporations].    Youri’s    Russian    friend Svetlana   Obolensky   shows   us   letters   that   Youri   sent her   over   the   years,   starting   from   1975.   They   met each   other   for   the   first   time   at   the   Queen   Elisabeth Competition       in       Brussels.       Youri’s       depressive tendencies   also   become   clear   from   the   letter   and from fragments from his diary. We   see   scenes   from   Brescia,   Italy,   where   the   refugee camp   was   situated   where   Youri   stayed   for   a   month before    he    could    travel    to    Amsterdam.    From    the extracts   from   his   diary   we   hear   that   he   had   there experienced    the    ultimate    in    loneliness.    Once    in Amsterdam   he   seemed   in   the   beginning   to   be   more interested    in    enjoying    the    freedom    there,    which could   give   rise   to   problems.   At   the   same   time   he was   sometimes   playing   crazy   programmes,   such   as all   twenty-four   Chopin   Etudes   in   order   to   rival   his teacher, Yakov Zak. René    Martin,    at    that    time    director    of    La    Roque d’Antherón,   tells   about   the   discovery   of   Youri   and   his participation    in    the    first    festival.    That    Youri    had problems   going   along   with   the   media   circus   became apparent   during   an   interview   that   was   made   with him   during   that   festival.   Youri   turned   his   back   on the    camera    in    a    clear    display    of    displeasure.    Jan Brouwer:   “Youri   was   more   someone   who   was   too sensitive   to   the   ambiance   in   which   he   was   playing.” Maria   Joao   Pires   recounts:   “In   addition   to   a   perfect technique   he   had   a   capacity   that   you   rarely   find   in people:      communicating      with      higher      spheres. Alongside   that   there   was   the   capacity   for   intense suffering in his playing.” At    the    end    of    the    documentary,    Hans    Kerkhoff returns     briefly     to     Youri’s     last     concert     in     the Concertgebouw    in    Amsterdam    where    he    played Schubert’s   Moments   Musicaux:   “As   musician   he   was at   his   best   in   his   last   days.   That   Schubert,   that   was unforgettable.   In   retrospect   you   could   almost   say, on the boundary of death.” Youri    Egorov    Foundation    (Stichting    Youri Egorov) After   Youri’s   death   the   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   was created   in   his   memory,   in   the   beginning   with   Dick Swaan   as   chairperson.   Betty   Prins   filled   this   position later. Youri    Egorov    was    always    trying    to    encourage    the exchange   of   musical   ideas   between   East   and   West. With      his      great      knowledge      of      the      Moscow Conservatory   and   the   love   of   Amsterdam   that   he soon   gained,   he   was   the   ideal   person   for   such   a dialogue.    He    gave    masterclasses    at,    among    other places,   the   Sweelinck   Conservatory   in   Amsterdam, encouraged     young     musicians,     such     as     Andrei Nikolsky,    from    Eastern    Block    lands,    and    received East-European    musicians    who    performed    in    the Netherlands.   Partly   through   modesty,   partly   due   to the    political    situation,    he    said    little    about    these contacts.   The   rapid   changes   in   Moscow   that   he   was able   to   experience   during   the   last   months   of   his   life, he   welcomed   as   a   blessing   for   music.   Continuing along     this     way,     the     Youri     Egorov     Foundation proposed    as    its    aims    not    only    bringing    Youri’s existing    recording    material    out    on    CD,    but    also advancing   the   musical   education   and   development of   young   musicians   in   the   Netherlands   and   Eastern Europe.   This   latter   has   been   attempted   by   means   of the    creation    of    exchange    programmes    between young musicians and the provision of grants. This     began     with     the     organization     of     a     benefit concert   in   the   Concertgebouw   in   Amsterdam   on   29 May      1989,      in      which      well-known      musicians participated.     This     was     followed     by     an     equally successful benefit concert in Brussels. At    the    same    time    as    the    benefit    concert,    the foundation      produced      its      first      CD,      with      the memorable Moments Musicaux by Schubert. During    the    foundation’s    early    years,    concerts    and masterclasses    were    organized    in    Youri    Egorov’s former    home    on    the    Keizersgracht.    Furthermore, young   musicians   could   lodge   and   rehearse   there. This,   too,   had   been   one   of   Youri’s   wishes.   During   his busy    concert    career    he    had    often    experienced relatively   poor   facilities   for   soloists   and   had   seen how   difficult   it   often   is   to   practise   with   the   necessary concentration   in   a   strange   city.   After   a   few   years   the concerts     relocated     to     the     Amstelkerk     (also     in Amsterdam).   Many   musicians   were   happy   to   take part in these concerts. The   foundation   produced   a   further   three   CD’s   after the   Schubert   one,   and   later   combined   all   four   into   a box with the title Youri Egorov Legacy. These   CD’s   bear   recordings   that   had   not   previously appeared    on    CD.    On    the    CD    box    is    shown    a silhouette    of    Youri,    created    by    Elly    Stroucken-de Jager.    This    silhouette    served    as    the    basis    for    the foundation’s   beautiful   logo.   The   lines   crossing   each other    come    from    a    work    of    art    in    Youri’s    house, designed by Aldo van den Nieuwelaar. After   17   busy   years,   the   steering   committee   of   the Youri   Egorov   Foundation   decided   in   2005   to   wind   up the   foundation   in   the   form   it   had   taken   until   then. At    the    same    time    it    was    decided    to    employ    the foundation’s    capital    for    a    similar    purpose    while perpetuating   Youri   Egorov’s   name.   This   capital   was made    available    to    the    Young    Pianist    Foundation (YPF),   which   had   been   founded   in   1999.   The   aim   of the   YPF   is   to   raise   the   standard   of   Dutch   tuition   to an    international    level.    It    organizes    performances, competitions   and   masterclasses   and   produces   CD’s. The   Youri   Egorov   Foundation   continues   as   a   Name Fund     under     the     YPF,     thus     contributing     to     the realization of the YPF’s aims. Benefit concert One   of   the   foundation’s   first   public   activities   was   the organization   of   a   benefit   concert   on   29   May   1989   in the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. Prominent   musicians   took   part   in   this,   such   as   Maria Joao   Pires,   Mischa   Maisky,   Emmy   Verhey,   the   late pianist     Andrei     Nikolsky     and     Pavel     Egorov     (no relation). The   exodus   of   Russian   musicians   to   the   west   had forced      the      Russian      authorities      to      take      due measures.    For    this    benefit    concert    Pavel    Egorov received   permission   for   the   first   time   in   twelve   years to perform abroad. Equally   successful   was   the   benefit   concert   that   the foundation   later   organized   in   the   Palace   of   Pure   Arts in    Brussels,    with    stars    such    as    Valeri    Afanassiev, Vadim    Sacharov,    Gidon    Kremer,    Andrei    Nikolsky, Mischa     Maisky,     Martha     Argerich     and     Alexander Rabinovitch. Links Youri’s   favourite   pianists   were   Sviatoslav   Richter   and Arturo   Benedetti   Michelangeli.   In   addition   he   had great   admiration   for   the   singers   Maria   Callas   and Kathleen Ferrier. You    will    find    here    links    to    the    sites    about    these musicians. Young Pianist Foundation [ LINK  ] Sviatoslav Richter [ LINK ] Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli [ LINK  ] Jakov Zak [ LINK  ] Maria Callas [ LINK  ] Kathleen Ferrier [ LINK  ] Colophon Editors: Gerda Koppelman, Stan Van Loon English translation (from the Dutch): Gerald Mettam
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